What You Should Be Doing Each Night For Better Sleep

What You Should Be Doing Each Night For Better Sleep

If your mind is racing in the evening, night-time wakings are causing daytime fatigue, or you’re simply committed to being your best self in 2019, please read on. As part of our holistic approach to fat loss and wellness, we enlisted the help of sleep specialist Olivia Arezzolo, to share 6 tips for better sleep. All we ask is that you implement them – nothing changes until you do.

1. Prepare for success

Just like your mattress matters, so does what’s on top. Dress your bed to feel like a cloud. Thermoregulatory fabrics are not only softly tactile against the skin, the cooling properties are instrumental for quality rest: a study published in Journal of Physiological Anthropology notes a high core body temperature causes night time wakings.

2. Get shady

In the evening for 2 hours before bed, wear blue-light blocking glasses, which prevent stimulating light entering the eyes – otherwise production of the sleep cycle hormone melatonin can be delayed by 90 minutes, according to scientific research. And note that this doesn’t just come from devices; blue light is emitted from street and ceiling lights too. Note – if you’re out late, skip this step.

3. Wear something special to bed

How excited are you to workout when you’ve got a new pair of Lorna Janes vs your 5 year old training gear your mum bought you? Same. Wear something that feels luxe on the skin and makes you feel you’re on holiday… even when you’re not.

4. Have a cup of chamomile tea

Gran was onto something here. As reported in Molecular Medicine Reports, a compound in chamomile – apinegin – calms the mind and has a similar effects on the brain as sleeping pills, albeit less severe, and thus, safe! Too hot? Stick a few ice cubes in. Don’t want to wee all night? Only make it with half the amount of water.

5. Meditate, journal, read a book or cuddle your partner

Just do something that isn’t work, emails or instagram, ok? The important part here is that you’re switching off – and my recommendation, based upon clinical research published in Frontiers of Neurology around anxiety reduction and insomnia relief, is meditation.

6. And avoid… sleeping in on the weekend

As published in Current Biology, scientists found a lack of sleep during the week, shifts your body-clock backwards, meaning you’re not tired until later the following evening. Further, it messes with your metabolism. An alternative? The humble 30 minute nap.

Written by Sleep Specialist and Body Catalyst friend, Olivia Arezzolo.

 

For more information on fat loss or overall wellness please contact one of our qualified Body Catalyst therapists to book your free consultation.

If you are interested in sleep optimisation programs from The Sleep Solution, please contact Olivia Arezzolo and ask about our special Body Catalyst discount on sleep coaching and programs.